A path of 269 steps, looking up

Citizens of Ludwigslust inspect the WWII Wöbbelin concentration camp after its liberation in 1945. Image: U.S. National Archives & Records Admin. / ARC 531297 / Public Domain

Citizens of Ludwigslust inspect the WWII Wöbbelin concentration camp after its liberation in 1945.
Image: U.S. National Archives & Records Admin. / ARC 531297 / Public Domain

 
In the afternoon of May 2nd 1945, the U.S. 82nd Airborne Division liberated the SS concentration camp of Wöbbelin. 
The next day, General James M. Gavin ordered the citizens of the neighbouring towns to walk an inspection tour through the camp, forcing them to witness, and to acknowledge.
The stench of more than 1,000 deaths carried for miles.
The camp had existed for barely ten weeks.
 
 
 
 

A Path Of Two Hundred And Sixty-Nine Steps, Looking Up is a singular book and installation project that retraces the steps taken by the citizens of Ludwigslust, Germany, who were forced to inspect the concentration camp of Wöbbelin in the nearby forest immediately after its liberation in 1945.

A path walked through the present day remains of the camp in the middle of the woods, in the same way inspecting but what remains 72 years later, systematically creating a digital pinhole capture at ever single step taken, the camera facing up, looking the other way like so many did before.

The inspection round lasts exactly 269 steps, eventually ending up at the exit of the camp, the empty sky above.

The resulting photographs are bundled into a single hand made book, printed and bound in the artist's studio.

The book exists in one unique single copy only.

The vertical installation exists of 269 pinhole images in 6 frames, a 269 sec. video loop, and an audio loop.

 

Book

IMG_8676.jpg
 

Video

 

Installation